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of americans. that is the bush and 55 for 47 days is noted the president-elect would be. we had court cases, demonstrations, charges back-and-forth that make even the mud whistling and cable television to the lipton. it was a mess. in the and the supreme court had to intervene. and don't agree it was a 5-4 vote. floridian was miscounting. it was a bow to have. americans never thought an election as legitimate. and then flush presidency and the bad feelings that have come from an. monitoring the election. if there are any irregularities, business, front you can bet that this would go to court. we can only a few thousand votes away from john kerry challenging him on election results, and the could have watched the same process. the dean of american global scientists as we of the sloppy a selection systems of any industrialized democracy. that was true then minister now. we still have time to take remedial steps will the election to minimize the sloppiness, incompetents, and from. from has distorted history in american life. it just like to be decent and animals college students. and live in n
. [applause] be mac thank you. there's a little less than two months before the election and in many ways this is the time the book was designed for because this are into these last two months, this is the election really get going. and to me, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove and he's in behind the scenes the whole time and he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. read new york here are not going to see much spent in the battleground states. and he's become king of the sub two. he has cover when you put this together money with money romney has raised the republican national committee is a total of about $1.8 billion. to put that in this, in no way, mccain had 375 million to spend, so this is a fact or a five. you'll start seeing it come out now. the other thing i want to discuss about him, is susie really? what does he do? is a political operative. how does he operate? what does he do? i talked to a couple services. one said there is a dark and terrible beauty about what he does. i have a
to find a republican operative, a republican elected official, a republican, even inside of romney's own campaign who felt self-confident, who felt confident about their guy. everybody was belly aching. we went up to do some reporting about this fiscal cliff debate on capitol hill? we talked to republicans. republicans talk about the debate like it is a foregone conclusion president obama was going to win re-election. just the mood going in and the mood going out is dramatic to have people actually saying hey, romney our guy. best debate in 20 years are coming from "the weekly standard", by bill kristol who spent the last month being a professional romney critic. >> expectations game moving forward because harder for republicans argue before the next presidential debate and president obama is great orator and romney is so, so. we saw romney give stronger performance. expectations for him will be higher in the next debate. >> james, one of our 10 to 20 reporters we have on the ground at the debate in denver has been in the spin room. he is joining us. hey, homan, forget the romney side of
but there are many world religions electives proliferating. fairfax county has the 11 and maryland has quite a few. not many districts have a lot of world religion elective and bible courses are proliferating. not all of them good but some quite good. the core curriculum with more national inclusion of teaching of religion is a tougher nut to crack because of all the issues of concern about teachers not being prepared to teach about religion. we have to address the core curriculum including more about how religions are part of society and the role of religion. we have got -- come along way in 20 years but we still have a lot of work to do. >> next question. the want to add to that? >> i do not think the establishment clause was the cause of this. there is a religious literacy problem. the establishment cause and enforcement of it has -- it would be worse if it were not the case. that is the tougher question but americans, literacy in areas, a lot to do on the front. [talking over each other] >> i write a syndicated column called ethics and religion. same-sex marriage is inevitable in the united st
before on the 2004 race. i think i have one president, election in me. if we start a family, i would like to get one manufacture more presidential. she was okay with nap i had two candidates i liked. i asked to around people they didn't see al gore getting in. the other was john edwards. i liked john edwards at the time. and that didn't go -- there was a little bit of back and forth going on with that. and that didn't seem to be developing. so didn't look like anything was going to happen. there was one other candidates i liked. it was president obama. four years and a half years ago people back in the fall of 2006 would say things like, he's never going get elected there's no way america would elect a prime african-american you can't get elected with the name barack obama. it's actually didn't matter. i didn't know anybody in chicago. i didn't know anybody around the candidate. so it didn't look like anything was going to be happening. december 26, december 26, 2006 my wife and i were shopping day after christmas we were shopping in a borns and noble just up the road in california. my ph
, it created a lot of debt we have to pay off. that's kind of our messaging. we try to hold elected officials to account for the record and also for the promises they have made. that's why a lot of incumbents don't like super pacs. >> we have an important note. one of the things we talk about is targeting. living here between new york and philadelphia media market you're not going to see any of these most likely. potentially pennsylvania has been a target state. neither campaign or the super pacs advertising in in sylvania. it's the most expensive market in the target states. i think it's also important to remember, there's a lot of money that is concentrated to a very small number of states and ultimately a small number of people as well. that's something i think is very important. a big part campaign finance reform and the unintended consequences. that's what my pet peeves is the unintended consequences sometimes as well intended legislation. we want to open up to questions. we will give maggie a chance to respond but i didn't want to become the moderator but somehow that may happen. but we
. the first thing is we were in the middle of an election campaign, and candidate bill clinton was comparing beijing to baghdad. and this was right at the time when china was moving from baghdad to paris. maybe i'm overstating the case a little bit, but that's essentially what was happening. i mean, this was a dramatic shift in china, and the u.s. government paid absolutely no attention to it. it had no impact on the policies of the clinton administration when it took office. and, of course, since i was the american ambassador to china this confronted me with problems with an american government that had one view of china, that china was already moving in a different direction, and that created some contradictions in trying to carry out my instructions faithfully. but i think this time, you have something that goes of that. clearly are the bush eli a fair has exposed that china's political system is not different from others. leaders struggle for power. they have their own ambitions. some succeed, some come crashing down, as in the case of bush eli. so we shouldn't assume that just because c
come back and you know, fred's points are well taken which is for a lot of voters, the election started last night. if he is going to have a come back in ohio, it started last night. >> and fred and then we are going to open it up for the rest of you folks -- president obama one last time and beat senator mccain by seven points. now, part of it was you know, 66% of the vote among 18 to 29-year-olds, 67% of the vote among latino voters. african-american was like 95-4 or something like that and the poll has shown the african-american vote is rocksolid for the president and the numbers extremely high so lets let's just sort of assume rough parity with last time. but the question was, as you suggested the turnout levels among latino voters and i would add young voters very much questionable and when i have gone on campuses i cannot find a pulse. you saw a registration table registered to voters. there might be a couple of people behind the table to register people and nobody in front of the table registering. there's there is just no pulse there. is it safe to say that a seven-point
that separation? another question that's obvious to raise, especially with an election coming up, is in this any way to cover an election? it's a really good question, and i'm sure the session will spark good conversations, and i hope it will give us some good ideas as well. this looks like a fascinating program, and we're very, very proud to host it. thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> thank you very much. and now i'd like to hand the floor over to jim corpsville of stony brook university who will lead our plenary panel asking, is this any way to cover an election? >> thank you, a.j., and good morning to everybody. we have a very distinguished and knowledgeable panel to talk about this topic, the timing, obviously, couldn't be better, debates wednesday night. let me introduce the people on the panel. to my immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint
romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it is a dictated view. >> host: thanks so much on the mall of the government in relation to the city and its relationship with federal government. and detroit. swb writes the government should do its job and maintain the general welfare. from debate news the numbers are in on how many people watched on television. more than 600 million watched the debate in this election cycle nearly 15 million were going to watch t
, nonliberal, not conservatives. the challenges facing their last election, a challenge from the raid. it does affect how you can behave in the senate to some degree. and we have seen that with both parties. so it seems to be getting worse and harder other than people making it easier. >> let me just make two points. one is let's not forget that 2009 and 2010, the democrats had majorities in both houses of congress. they were vetoproof purity of that stimulus package, obama cared, dodd-frank, the institution of the united states are too big -- are not too big to fail. so they had two years and they had majority for two years and they ran things through with all due respect. we were never consulted about obama cared. we were never consulted about the stimulus. we were never consulted about dodd-frank. we all have to work together between 2009 and 2010. amendment 2010 elections were rejected and if we hadn't had candidates in three swing states, we probably would've been the majority in the united states senate. when i look at all the polarization to work with me for two years. the citizens unit
or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation
won't say yeah, we are right even in the best political climate after an election everyone is trying to be nice they can't make progress at the policy is so toxic they are not going to do with the problem. still downgrade. as we have to move past 2013 no matter what. you don't need causing the recession a threat to force us to move. in fact it is irresponsible to have the recession so we should get past the fiscal cliff, extend the ceiling and get to the fundamentals in this grand bargain that will for ever get rid of the fiscal cliff and have a tax code and get rid of the sequestered because we know what the plan will be and that is the best way to go. >> so, the way we got here to the fiscal cliff is a bunch of the cans kept getting kicked down the road and happened to land right in front of us now at the end of december. if you look at cbo office of the fiscal plan if you notice the scary part is the pile of cans that happen to be in front of us right now. there's a good part of the cliff though and that is the part that stretches on throughout the rest of the ten year budget wind
willingly lose an election if i could solve these problems. it is that serious. tim geithner, the treasury secretary, in the book is quoted thousands of words telling the president, you have got to do something about this problem. we have to fix it. you literally, it's not that we're going to close down the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing in excess, he tells the president of the united states if we default on this, on our obligations and our ious, we will trigger a depression worse than the 1930s. anybody here remember the 19 1930s depression? you probably don't. i don't. i was not born, but i've read about it. it was a calamity for the world. tim geithner said to the president what, if we default on this, if we do not solve this problem, we will have an economic catastrophe that will make the 2008 financial crisis a footnote in the history books. anyone remember the 2008 financial crisis? that's coming not from some columnist or journalist, that is
and there was no pressure on that one. we are moving into another election about change. the central question is whether government is capable of contributing to positive change. the stimulus is exhibit a for the republican argument which is weird because it really ought to be exhibit a for the argument that it can. i realize i sound like an obama cheerleader. it is an extremely uncomfortable role for me and there's a theme for the end of the book where i am talking to joe biden who oversaw the stimulus. he let me sit in on a cabinet meeting devoted to the stimulus and basically giving me a hard time. i read all your articles. you are the only guy who wrote anything remotely positive. i am usually more of a downer than little mary sunshine. my friends will back me up on that. it is unusual for me. he started laughing at me. took him to bed and slept on them -- i didn't get into journalism to tell stories that joe biden would want to cuddle with. i followed the facts and my stories look blowing compared to the ridiculous thoughts ofs without the gotcha that passed for stimulus journalism. as i said about
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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